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Updated: 23 hours 34 min ago

Longtime Band Leader Jay Rees Returning to Alma Mater

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 3:50am
Over the past two decades, Rees has led the Pride of Arizona, known as the "World's First Alternative Music Marching Band." Rees has taken a position with the University of Miami.

Are Millennials Redefining Adulthood?

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 3:50am

UA Researchers Study Increasing Lifespan and Immune Function

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 3:50am
UA researchers are testing if dietary interventions that extend lifespan increase or decrease immune defense against infection. Nearly one quarter of the U.S. population will be over age 65 by 2040, and ensuring the healthy and productive lives of that very large group is becoming an urgent priority, says Dr. Nikolich-Žugich, co-director of the UA Center on Aging.

Support for UA Native American Grad Students Gets Boost With $2.4M Grant

Wed, 08/27/2014 - 3:50am
The UA and three other higher education institutions have united to increase the number of American Indian and Alaska Native students in the STEM fields. The collaboration has just received a $2.4 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, supporting the Sloan Indigenous Graduate Partnership, which was established at the UA.

Founding Faculty: Dr. Jack M. Layton Recalls 'Once-in-a-Lifetime' Opportunity

Mon, 08/25/2014 - 3:50am
In 1966, Dr. Jack Layton got an unexpected phone call from Dr. Monte DuVal, founding dean of the UA College of Medicine. DuVal was starting a new medical school, with a strong student focus, in Tucson and wanted Layton to join him. In 1967, Layton left his home in Iowa to become the first department head in the UA College of Medicine, which welcomed an inaugural class of 32 students that year. Those students would later honor him as "The Father of the Class of '71."

UA Training Medical Students to Serve Patients in Rural Communities

Mon, 08/25/2014 - 3:50am
UA College of Medicine students are spending the summer serving rural communities through a program designed to address the shortage of physician in Arizona's non-urban areas. The Rural Health Professions Program encourages medical students to practice in small Arizona communities, where there's a desperate need for medical specialists.